Learning Intention. Name and describe the components of a neuron

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Learning Intention. Name and describe the components of a neuron"

Transcription

1 c) Neural Pathways

2 Learning Intention Name and describe the components of a neuron

3 Cells of the Nervous System The nervous system consists of a complex network of nerve cells called neurons which receive and transmit electrical signals (nerve impulses) and glial cells which support and maintain the neurons Video

4 Structure of a Neuron node

5 Dendrites Dendrites are nerve fibres which receive nerve impulses and pass them towards a cell body.

6 Cell Body The cell body contains the nucleus and most of the cytoplasm. It is the control centre of cell metabolism Cell body

7 Axon An axon is a single nerve fibre that carries nerve impulses away from a cell body Axon

8 interneurone AXON CELL BODY The direction in which a nerve impulse travels is always: dendrites cell body axon DENDRITE

9 Learning Intention Compare the myelin content of adults and infants

10 Myelin Myelin is the fatty tissue that insulates an axon The presence of myelin greatly increases the speed at which impulses can be transmitted

11 Myelination Myelination is the process by which myelin develops round axon fibres Myelination is not complete at birth and so over the first two years of life many more neurons are myelinated As a result responses to stimuli in the first two years of life are not as rapid as there are slower impulses

12 Myelination Summary Axons are surrounded by a myelin sheath which insulates the axon and increases the speed of impulse conduction from node to node. Myelination continues from birth to adolescence. As a result responses to stimuli in the first two years of life are not as rapid or coordinated as those of an older child or adult. Certain diseases destroy the myelin sheath causing a loss of coordination.

13 Learning Intention State that there are 3 different types of neuron

14 Types of Neuron Sensory neurons, carry impulses into the Central Nervous System (CNS) from sense organs Interneurons, found in the CNS where they connect with other neurons Motor neurons, carry impulses out from the CNS to effectors such as muscles and glands

15 Types of Neuron

16 Learning Intention Discuss the role of glial cells

17 Glial Cells Glial cells do not transmit nerve impulses but physically support the neurons. One type is found in the central nervous system. If damage occurs to the neurons, they multiply and remove debris by phagocytosis

18 Glial Cells Others constantly sample and homeostatically regulate the chemical environment of the neurons, removing excess ions and recycling neurotransmitters so that the neuron functions in very constant conditions. Other types of glial cells are responsible for myelination

19 Glial Cells Summary Glial cells physically support neurons and produce the myelin sheath. They also maintain a homeostatic environment around the neurones and remove debris by phagocytosis.

20 Lesson starter b) Which direction would the impulse move? Why? c) What are the two functions of myelin? d) What are the three types of neuron? e) What are glial cells and what do they do?

21 Learning Intention Describe the structure of a synapse and movement of neurotransmitter

22 Synapses The tiny gap between an axon ending of one neuron and the dendrite of the next neuron in the pathway is called a synapse The plasma membranes of the two neurons are very close but are separated by a space called the synaptic cleft Video

23 Synapses The nerve cell before the synaptic cleft is called the presynaptic neuron synaptic cleft The nerve cell after the synaptic cleft is called the postsynaptic neuron As well as connecting to other each, neurons can also connect with muscle fibers and endocrine glands

24 Neurotransmitter Messages are relayed across synaptic clefts by chemicals called neurotransmitters There are many neurotransmitters passed on at the synapse. Two examples are: ACETYLCHOLINE NORADRENALINE

25 Neurotransmitter Neurotransmitters are stored in vesicles at each presynaptic terminal. When a nerve impulse arrives, the vesicles fuse with the membrane and release neurotransmitter into the cleft The neurotransmitters then diffuse across the cleft and bind to receptors on the postsynaptic membrane

26 Neurotransmitter The vesicles containing neurotransmitters occur on one side of the synapse only. This means nerve impulses travel in one direction only. Video 1 Video 2

27 Learning Intention State the difference between excitatory and inhibitory signals

28 Excitatory and Inhibitory Signals The type of alteration to a postsynaptic membrane that occurs following the binding of a neurotransmitter depends on the type of receptor present The signal generated is determined by the receptor and may be either excitatory or inhibitory

29 Excitatory and Inhibitory Signals Acetylcholine released into the cleft between a motor neuron and a skeletal muscle fibre binds to receptors that have an excitatory effect and make the muscle fibres contract eg peristalsis Acetylcholine released into a cleft between a motor neuron and a heart muscle fibre instead binds with receptors which have an inhibitory effect. This reduces the rate and strength of contraction of heart muscle

30 Neurotransmitter Summary Neurotransmitters relay messages from nerve to nerves within and outwith the brain. Neurons connect with other neurons, muscles fibres and endocrine glands at a synaptic cleft. Neurotransmitters are stored in vesicles and released into the cleft on arrival of an impulse. They diffuse across the cleft and bind to receptors on nerve endings. The receptor determines whether the signal is excitatory or inhibitory.

31 Learning Intention Describe the filtering of weak stimuli and summation

32 Weak Stimuli A nerve impulse is only transmitted across a synapse if there is release of enough neurotransmitter A critical number of neurotransmitter molecules is needed (threshold) to affect a sufficient number of receptors on the postsynaptic membrane This means weak stimuli are filtered out because not enough transmitter molecules reach the next neurone

33

34 Summation A series of weak stimuli can combine to trigger enough neurotransmitter to fire an impulse in the post-synaptic neuron, a process known as summation.

35 Curare General name given to several poisons. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that relays messages needed to bring about muscular contraction in vertebrates. When a muscle is wounded by a poison dart or injected with curare, the poison binds with acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of muscle fibres. This results in the neural pathway becoming blocked and no nerve impulses reaching the muscles. These muscles fail to contract and remain relaxed in a state of paralysis. Therefore Curare is described as a muscle relaxant.

36 Learning Intentions Explain the need for and methods of removal of neurotransmitters

37 Removal of Neurotransmitter Between impulses the transmitter molecules are rapidly removed from the synaptic cleft to prevent continuous stimulation of postsynaptic neurones There are 2 types of removal: Re-uptake Enzyme degradation

38 Re-uptake Noradrenaline undergoes reuptake by being reabsorbed directly into the presynaptic membrane that secreted it and is stored in a vesicle ready for use

39 Enzyme Degradation Acetylcholine is broken down by an enzyme into non active products which are then reabsorbed by the presynaptic neuron and resynthesised into active neurotransmitter

40 Removal and Summation Summary Synapses can filter out weak stimuli arising from insufficient secretion of neurotransmitters. Summation of a series of weak stimuli can trigger enough neurotransmitter to fire an impulse. Neurotransmitters must be removed from the synaptic cleft to prevent continuous stimulation of post synaptic neurones. Neurotransmitters are removed by enzymes or reuptake.

41 Learning Intention Explain the difference between converging, diverging and reverberating neural pathways

42 Complex Neural Pathways Neurones are found to be connected to one another in many different ways in the CNS Examples of neural pathways are: DIVERGING NEURAL PATHWAY CONVERGING NEURAL PATHWAY REVERBERATING NEURAL PATHWAY

43 Converging Neural Pathways To converge means to come together and meet at a common point. Converging path ways are where two or more neurones feed impulses to one neurone Converging neural pathways increase the sensitivity to excitatory or inhibitory signals.

44 Converging Neural Pathways Rods are visual receptors present in the retina of the eye. They contain pigments which break down in the presence of light. In each case, this breakdown forms a chemical which triggers off nerve impulses along a pathway of neurones

45 Converging Neural Pathways The nerve impulse transmitted by one rod is weak. It would mean not enough neurotransmitter would be released to carry on the impulse. Several rods converge to one rod biploar cell to allow enough neurotransmitter to be released.

46 Diverging Neural Pathways In a diverging neural pathway, the route along which an impulse is travelling divides Diverging neural pathways mean that an impulse in one neurone can have a simultaneous effect in many parts of the body An example of diverging pathways is fine motor control in the fingers

47 Reverberating Pathway Reverberation means a sound that occurs repeatedly, as in an echo In reverberating pathway neurones later in the pathway posses axon branches which synapse with earlier neurones sending the impulse back through the circuit

48 Neural Pathways Summary Converging neural pathways increase the sensitivity to excitatory or inhibitory signals. Diverging neural pathways influence several neurons at the same time. In a reverberating pathway neurones later in the pathway synapse with earlier ones sending the impulse back through the circuit.

49 Learning Intentions Explain the term plasticity Compare minor and major plasticity

50 Development of New Neural Pathways The brain is not hard wired with fixed neural pathways, the neurons undergo change in their synaptic network The brain cells ability to become altered as a result of new environmental experiences is called plasticity of response

51 Plasticity Plasticity of response enables new neural pathways to form, especially during: early development of the brain the learning of new skills response to brain injury

52 Major Plasticity Major plasticity follows brain damage, when undamaged cells form new neural pathways take on the function of the damaged area

53 Major Plasticity in Stroke Victims After a stroke, during the first few months, some sufferers are found to make a significant recovery and regain speech or use of their limb The neurons in the damaged area have not regained their functional state, instead neurons in another region of the brain have formed new neural pathways enabling to take on these jobs

54 Minor Plasticity Minor plasticity is when the brain suppresses reflexes e.g. blinking or suppresses sensory impulses causing distraction from a task

55 Minor Plasticity Plasticity is thought to occur as you have two conflicting messages - one saying to blink and the other not to blink meeting in a convergent pathway If the overall effect at the synapse is excitatory then the nerve impulse is fired and blinking occurs If the overall effect is inhibitory then no impulse is fired and blinking fails to occur This explains why some people can resist blinking whilst others can t help themselves

56 Minor Plasticity If a person is given a task to do that requires a lot of concentration and is subjected to auditory and visual distractions, some people are good at suppressing the sensory impulses from the distractions and perform well each time. Other people find it hard to block out the sensory impulses

57 Plasticity Summary New neural pathways can be developed to create new responses, bypass areas of brain damage or to suppress reflexes or responses to sensory impulses creating a plasticity of response.

58 Blinking Experiment Your partner will have 10 attempts to make you blink using a sterile plastic dropper secured in a clamp stand You will have 10 seconds between each trial to summon maximum willpower Compare your results: who was good at suppressing this reflex action? Who couldn t resist blinking?

59 Learning Intentions Describe the role of endorphins Describe the role of dopamine and the reward pathway

60 Endorphins Endorphins are neurotransmitters that stimulate neurones involved in reducing the intensity of pain Increased levels are also connected with euphoric feelings, appetite modulation and release of sex hormones.

61 Endorphins Endorphin production increases in response to: severe injury prolonged and continuous exercise stress certain foods

62 Dopamine and Reward Pathway The reward pathway involves neurones which secrete or respond to the neurotransmitter dopamine Dopamine induces the feeling of pleasure and reinforces particular behaviours

63 Dopamine and Reward Pathway The neurons of the reward pathway are located in the mid-brain below the cortex, and link to the areas at the base of the cortex and in the frontal areas of the cortex. The reward pathway is activated on engagement of beneficial behaviours, eg eating when hungry

64 Endorphins Summary Endorphins are neurotransmitters that stimulate neurones involved in reducing the intensity of pain. Increased levels are also connected with euphoric feelings, appetite modulation and release of sex hormones. Endorphin production increases in response to severe injury, prolonged and continuous exercise, stress and certain foods.

65 Dopamine Summary The reward pathway involves neurones which secrete or respond to the neurotransmitter dopamine. The reward pathway is activated on engagement of beneficial behaviours, eg eating when hungry. Dopamine induces the feeling of pleasure and reinforces particular behaviours.

66 Learning Intentions Discuss the causes, symptoms and treatment of neurotransmitter disorders Describe the mode of action of agonist, antagonist and inhibitor drugs

67 Neurotransmitter Disorders Many drugs used to treat neurotransmitter related disorders are similar to neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitter disorders include Alzheimer s disease Parkinson s disease Schizophrenia

68 Antagonists bind to specific receptors blocking the action of the neurotransmitter. Agonists and Antagonists Agonists bind to and stimulate receptors mimicking the neurotransmitter and triggering a normal cellular response

69 Inhibitors Other drugs inhibit the enzymes (e.g. cholinesterase) which degrade neurotransmitters (e.g. acetylcholine) Or inhibit re-absorption of the neurotransmitter (e.g. noradrenalin)

70 Neurotransmitter Disorder Summary Many drugs used to treat neurotransmitter related disorders are similar to neurotransmitters. Agonists bind to and stimulate receptors mimicking the neurotransmitter. Antagonists bind to specific receptors blocking the action of the neurotransmitter. Other drugs inhibit the enzymes which degrade neurotransmitters or inhibit reuptake.

71 Learning Intention Describe the mode of action of recreational drugs

72 Recreational Drugs Many recreational drugs affect neurotransmission in the reward circuit of the brain. They cause changes in neurochemistry leading to: changes in mood cognition perception behaviour

73 Recreational Drugs Recreational drugs interact with neurotransmitters in different ways, they can: stimulate the release of neurotransmitters imitate the action (agonists) block their binding to receptors(antagonists) inhibit their re-uptake inhibit their breakdown by enzymes

74 Recreational Drugs Summary Many recreational drugs affect neurotransmission in the reward circuit of the brain. Changes in neurochemistry alter mood, cognition, perception and behaviour can occur. Recreational drugs may stimulate the release of neurotransmitters, imitate their action (agonists), block their binding (antagonists), and/or inhibit their re-uptake/enzymatic degradation.

75 Learning Intention Explain drug desensitisation and sensitisation

76 Drug Addiction Drug addiction can be defined as a chronic disease that causes the sufferer to compulsively seek out and use the drug regardless of the consequences

77 Drug Desensitisation Repeated use of a drug that acts as an agonist results in neurotransmitters (eg those that promote dopamine release) being repeatedly stimulated and increased feelings of wellbeing and euphoria

78 Drug Desensitisation The nervous system compenstates for overstimulation of these receptors by reducing their number and those receptors left become less sensitive to the agonist drug

79 Tolerance A larger dose is needed to stimulate the reduced number of less sensitive receptors in order to gain the original effect this is called tolerance

80 Drug Sensitisation Repeated use of a drug that acts as an antagonist by blocking neuroreceptors prevents normal neurotransmitter from acting on them.

81 Drug Sensitisation The nervous system compensates for the reduced stimulation of the receptors by increasing their number and the receptors become more sensitive to the antagonist drug

82 Addiction Sensitisation results in other psychological changes, which transform ordinary sensations of wanting into addiction

83 Remember Desensitisation is a decrease in the number and sensitivity of receptors as a result of exposure to drugs that are agonists and leads to drug tolerance. Sensitisation is an increase in the number and sensitivity of neurotransmitter receptors as a result of exposure to drugs that are antagonists and leads to addiction

84 Sensitisation and Desensitisation Summary Sensitisation and desensitisation are thought to underlie drug addiction and tolerance. Sensitisation is an increase in the number and sensitivity of neurotransmitter receptors as a result of exposure to drugs that are antagonists and leads to addiction. Desensitisation is a decrease in the number and sensitivity of receptors as a result of exposure to drugs that are agonists and leads to drug tolerance

85 Noradrenaline is the main neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nerves in the cardiovascular system. Noradrenaline produces wide ranging effects on many areas of the body and is often referred to as a 'fight or flight' chemical, as it is responsible for the body's reaction to stressful situations. Noradrenaline normally produces effects such as increased heart rate, increased blood pressure, widening of pupils, widening of air passages in the lungs and narrowing of blood vessels in non-essential organs. This enables the body to perform well in stressful situations. Noradrenaline works by stimulating receptors called adrenoceptors, which are found all over the body. When injected into a vein, noradrenaline acts mostly on a type of adrenoceptor known as an alpha receptor. These are found on muscle inside the walls of peripheral blood vessels. Stimulating these alpha receptors causes the muscle to contract, which makes the blood vessels constrict and narrow. Adrenaline metabolic and homeostasis Noradrenaline involved in the sympathetic nervous and cardiovascular system

35-2 The Nervous System Slide 1 of 38

35-2 The Nervous System Slide 1 of 38 1 of 38 35-2 The Nervous System The nervous system controls and coordinates functions throughout the body and responds to internal and external stimuli. 2 of 38 Neurons Neurons The messages carried by

More information

Body control systems. Nervous system. Organization of Nervous Systems. The Nervous System. Two types of cells. Organization of Nervous System

Body control systems. Nervous system. Organization of Nervous Systems. The Nervous System. Two types of cells. Organization of Nervous System Body control systems Nervous system Nervous system Quick Sends message directly to target organ Endocrine system Sends a hormone as a messenger to the target organ Slower acting Longer lasting response

More information

Nervous System Notes

Nervous System Notes Nervous System Notes The nervous system consists of a network of nerve cells or neurons. I. A nervous system is an important part of a cell s (or an organism s) ability to respond to the environment. A.

More information

The Nervous System & Nervous tissue. Dr. Ali Ebneshahidi

The Nervous System & Nervous tissue. Dr. Ali Ebneshahidi The Nervous System & Nervous tissue Dr. Ali Ebneshahidi Functions of the Nervous System 1. Nervous system and endocrine system are the chief control centers in maintaining body homeostasis. 2. Nervous

More information

STOP. The Nervous System How you know when to. doing something stupid. Or Keep doing something pleasurable. The Neuron. Different Types of Neurons

STOP. The Nervous System How you know when to. doing something stupid. Or Keep doing something pleasurable. The Neuron. Different Types of Neurons The Nervous System How you know when to STOP doing something stupid. Or Keep doing something pleasurable Complexity of the Brain The brain contains approximately 100 billion nerve cells, or neurons, and

More information

Chapter 17. Nervous System Nervous systems receive sensory input, interpret it, and send out appropriate commands. !

Chapter 17. Nervous System Nervous systems receive sensory input, interpret it, and send out appropriate commands. ! Chapter 17 Sensory receptor Sensory input Integration Nervous System Motor output Brain and spinal cord Effector cells Peripheral nervous system (PNS) Central nervous system (CNS) 28.1 Nervous systems

More information

Bio11: The Nervous System. Body control systems. The human brain. The human brain. The Cerebrum. What parts of your brain are you using right now?

Bio11: The Nervous System. Body control systems. The human brain. The human brain. The Cerebrum. What parts of your brain are you using right now? Bio11: The Nervous System Body control systems Nervous system Quick Sends message directly to target organ Endocrine system Sends a hormone as a messenger to the target organ Can target several organs

More information

Neural and Hormonal Systems

Neural and Hormonal Systems PSYCHOLOGY (8th Edition, in Modules) David Myers PowerPoint Slides Worth Publishers, 2007 1 Neural and Hormonal Systems Module 4 2 Neural and Hormonal Systems Neural Communication Neurons How Neurons Communicate

More information

6.5 Nerves, Hormones and Homeostasis

6.5 Nerves, Hormones and Homeostasis 6.5 Nerves, Hormones and Homeostasis IB Biology SL Part 1 - Nerves Outcomes Part 1 6.5.1State that the nervous system consists of the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nerves, and is composed

More information

Name: Period: Test Review: Chapter 2

Name: Period: Test Review: Chapter 2 Name: Period: Test Review: Chapter 2 1. The function of dendrites is to A) receive incoming signals from other neurons. B) release neurotransmitters into the spatial junctions between neurons. C) coordinate

More information

Nervous System Review

Nervous System Review Nervous System Review Name: Block: 1. Which processes are involved in the movement of molecule Y from point X to point Z? A. exocytosis and diffusion B. endocytosis and diffusion C. exocytosis and facilitated

More information

The Brain & Homeostasis. The Brain & Technology. CAT, PET, and MRI Scans

The Brain & Homeostasis. The Brain & Technology. CAT, PET, and MRI Scans The Brain & Homeostasis Today, scientists have a lot of information about what happens in the different parts of the brain; however they are still trying to understand how the brain functions. We know

More information

Axon Nerve impulse. Axoplasm Receptor. Axomembrane Stimuli. Schwann cell Effector. Myelin Cell body

Axon Nerve impulse. Axoplasm Receptor. Axomembrane Stimuli. Schwann cell Effector. Myelin Cell body Nervous System Review 1. Explain a reflex arc. 2. Know the structure, function and location of a sensory neuron, interneuron, and motor neuron 3. What is (a) Neuron Axon Nerve impulse Axoplasm Receptor

More information

BIOLOGY 12 NERVOUS SYSTEM PRACTICE

BIOLOGY 12 NERVOUS SYSTEM PRACTICE 1 Name: BIOLOGY 12 NERVOUS SYSTEM PRACTICE Date: 1) Identify structures X, Y and Z and give one function of each. 2) Which processes are involved in the movement of molecule Y from point X to point Z?

More information

Biology 12 Human Biology - The Nervous System Name. Main reference: Biology Concepts and Connects Sixth edition Chapter 28

Biology 12 Human Biology - The Nervous System Name. Main reference: Biology Concepts and Connects Sixth edition Chapter 28 Biology 12 Human Biology - The Nervous System Name Main reference: Biology Concepts and Connects Sixth edition Chapter 28 Vocabulary acetylcholine (ACh), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), action potential,

More information

Chapter 12 Nervous System Review Assignment

Chapter 12 Nervous System Review Assignment Name: Class: Date: Chapter 12 Nervous System Review Assignment Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Which part of a neuron receives an impulse

More information

NEURAL TISSUE (NEUROPHYSIOLOGY) PART I (A): NEURONS & NEUROGLIA

NEURAL TISSUE (NEUROPHYSIOLOGY) PART I (A): NEURONS & NEUROGLIA PART I (A): NEURONS & NEUROGLIA Neural Tissue Contains 2 kinds of cells: neurons: cells that send and receive signals neuroglia (glial cells): cells that support and protect neurons Neuron Types Sensory

More information

The Nervous System. Overall Function

The Nervous System. Overall Function The Nervous System The Nervous System Overall Function COMMUNICATION Works with the endocrine system in regulating body functioning, but the nervous system is specialized for SPEED Neurons A neuron is

More information

Nervous System. Master controlling and communicating system of the body. Secrete chemicals called neurotransmitters

Nervous System. Master controlling and communicating system of the body. Secrete chemicals called neurotransmitters Nervous System Master controlling and communicating system of the body Interacts with the endocrine system to control and coordinate the body s responses to changes in its environment, as well as growth,

More information

Concept 48.1 Neuron organization and structure reflect function in information transfer

Concept 48.1 Neuron organization and structure reflect function in information transfer Name Chapter 48: Neurons, Synapses, and Signaling Period Chapter 48: Neurons, Synapses, and Signaling Concept 48.1 Neuron organization and structure reflect function in information transfer 1. What is

More information

Neurons, Synapses, and Signaling

Neurons, Synapses, and Signaling Chapter 48 Neurons, Synapses, and Signaling PowerPoint Lecture Presentations for Biology Eighth Edition Neil Campbell and Jane Reece Lectures by Chris Romero, updated by Erin Barley with contributions

More information

Chapter Six Review Sections 1 and 2

Chapter Six Review Sections 1 and 2 NAME PER DATE Chapter Six Review Sections 1 and 2 Matching: 1. afferent nerves 2. autonomic nervous system 3. cell body 4. central nervous system (CNS) 5. dendrites 6. efferent nerves 7. myelin sheath

More information

Body control systems. Let s start at the top: the human brain. The Cerebrum. The human brain. What parts of your brain are you using right now?

Body control systems. Let s start at the top: the human brain. The Cerebrum. The human brain. What parts of your brain are you using right now? What parts of your brain are you using right now? Body control systems Quick Sends message directly to target organ Endocrine system Frontal lobe Parietal lobe Movement and conscious thought; Frontal speech

More information

THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. Neurons & Impulses

THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. Neurons & Impulses THE NERVOUS SYSTEM Neurons & Impulses Organization of the Nervous System: Two Major Portions: The central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). CNS = Brain/Spinal Cord PNS = Nerves-provide

More information

NERVOUS SYSTEM 1 CHAPTER 10 BIO 211: ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I

NERVOUS SYSTEM 1 CHAPTER 10 BIO 211: ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I BIO 211: ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I 1 Ch 10 A Ch 10 B This set CHAPTER 10 NERVOUS SYSTEM 1 BASIC STRUCTURE and FUNCTION Dr. Lawrence G. Altman www.lawrencegaltman.com Some illustrations are courtesy of McGraw-Hill.

More information

Modeling Neurotransmission and Drugs. CHM 108 Lab. Spring Dr. Angela King

Modeling Neurotransmission and Drugs. CHM 108 Lab. Spring Dr. Angela King Modeling Neurotransmission and Drugs CHM 18 Lab Spring 28 Dr. Angela King Part A: How does the brain communicate? The human brain is the most complex organ in the body. This three-pound mass of gray and

More information

The Nervous System : communication

The Nervous System : communication The Nervous System : communication A. Neurons = masses of nerve cells that transmit information 1. Cell Body - contains the nucleus and two extensions 2. Dendrites shorter, more numerous, receive information

More information

NERVOUS SYSTEM C H A P T E R 2 8

NERVOUS SYSTEM C H A P T E R 2 8 NERVOUS SYSTEM C H A P T E R 2 8 CAN AN INJURED SPINAL CORD BE FIXED? Injuries to the spinal cord disrupt communication between the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and the rest of the body

More information

The Nervous System : communication

The Nervous System : communication The Nervous System : communication A. Neurons = masses of nerve cells that transmit information 1. Cell Body - contains the nucleus and two extensions 2. Dendrites shorter, more numerous, receive information

More information

THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. Homeostasis Strand

THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. Homeostasis Strand THE NERVOUS SYSTEM Homeostasis Strand Introduction In general, a nervous system has three overlapping functions : 1. Sensory input conduction of signals from sensory receptors to integration centres 2.

More information

The Nervous System Mark Stanford, Ph.D.

The Nervous System Mark Stanford, Ph.D. The Nervous System Functional Neuroanatomy and How Neurons Communicate Mark Stanford, Ph.D. Santa Clara Valley Health & Hospital System Addiction Medicine and Therapy Services The Nervous System In response

More information

The Nervous System. making decisions regarding appropriate responses and behaviours. The PNS is made up of neurons throughout the rest of the body.

The Nervous System. making decisions regarding appropriate responses and behaviours. The PNS is made up of neurons throughout the rest of the body. The Nervous System The nervous system of the human body is responsible for numerous functions, such as: analysing sensory information from the body and external environment storing some information making

More information

Nervous tissue, charachteristics, neurons, glial cells

Nervous tissue, charachteristics, neurons, glial cells Nervous tissue, charachteristics, neurons, glial cells Functional Organization of Nervous Tissue The Nervous System Components Brain, spinal cord, nerves, sensory receptors Responsible for Sensory perceptions,

More information

[CHAPTER 12: THE NERVOUS SYSTEM] [ANSWER KEY]

[CHAPTER 12: THE NERVOUS SYSTEM] [ANSWER KEY] WORDBANK: Cholinesterase Dopamine Axon Choroid layer Cochlea Incus Action Potential Cataract Cornea Astigmatism Dendrite Malleus Alzheimer s Disease Central Excitatory Response Fovea Centralis Acetylcholine

More information

Bio11 schedule. Chapter 13 and 14. The Nervous System. The Nervous System. Organization of Nervous Systems. Nerves. Nervous and Sensory Systems

Bio11 schedule. Chapter 13 and 14. The Nervous System. The Nervous System. Organization of Nervous Systems. Nerves. Nervous and Sensory Systems Bio11 schedule Lecture Nervous system and senses Lab Current events reports (10 pts) Urinalysis Lecture exam 2 Thursday Feb 24 Same format as before Study guide will be posted Your total points so far

More information

Nervous system function Central and peripheral nervous system. Myelinated neurons Nerve signal transmission Nerve Synapse

Nervous system function Central and peripheral nervous system. Myelinated neurons Nerve signal transmission Nerve Synapse Outline Nervous System - Neurons Biol 105 Lecture Packet 9 Chapter 7 I. II. III. IV. V. VI. Nervous system function Central and peripheral nervous system Nervous system cells Myelinated neurons Nerve signal

More information

Neural Basis of Motor Control

Neural Basis of Motor Control Neural Basis of Motor Control Central Nervous System Skeletal muscles are controlled by the CNS which consists of the brain and spinal cord. Determines which muscles will contract When How fast To what

More information

Chapter 7. The Nervous System: Structure and Control of Movement

Chapter 7. The Nervous System: Structure and Control of Movement Chapter 7 The Nervous System: Structure and Control of Movement Objectives Discuss the general organization of the nervous system Describe the structure & function of a nerve Draw and label the pathways

More information

Chapter 7. Objectives

Chapter 7. Objectives Chapter 7 The Nervous System: Structure and Control of Movement Objectives Discuss the general organization of the nervous system Describe the structure & function of a nerve Draw and label the pathways

More information

Neural Tissue. Chapter 12 Part B

Neural Tissue. Chapter 12 Part B Neural Tissue Chapter 12 Part B CNS Tumors - Neurons stop dividing at age 4 but glial cells retain the capacity to divide. - Primary CNS tumors in adults- division of abnormal neuroglia rather than from

More information

10.1: Introduction. Cell types in neural tissue: Neurons Neuroglial cells (also known as neuroglia, glia, and glial cells) Dendrites.

10.1: Introduction. Cell types in neural tissue: Neurons Neuroglial cells (also known as neuroglia, glia, and glial cells) Dendrites. 10.1: Introduction Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Cell types in neural tissue: Neurons Neuroglial cells (also known as neuroglia, glia, and glial

More information

NEUROTRANSMITTERS. Contraction of muscles to move our bodies Release hormones Psychological states of thinking and emotions

NEUROTRANSMITTERS. Contraction of muscles to move our bodies Release hormones Psychological states of thinking and emotions NEUROTRANSMITTERS NEURONS Neurons don t actually touch Separated by a tiny fluid-filled gap called a synapse Neural impulses must be ferried across the synapse by chemical messengers called neurotransmitters.

More information

Communication within a Neuron

Communication within a Neuron Neuronal Communication, Ph.D. Communication within a Neuron Measuring Electrical Potentials of Axons The Membrane Potential The Action Potential Conduction of the Action Potential 1 The withdrawal reflex

More information

Nervous System 2. Quick Video

Nervous System 2. Quick Video Nervous System 2 McMurray/Tarshish Intro Psych Quick Video https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=4gdjcd68sge 1 10/16/15 Divisions of Nervous System Nervous system divisions CNS PNS Sensory (in) Motor (out)

More information

Neurotransmitters. Chemical transmission of a nerve signal by neurotransmitters at a synapse

Neurotransmitters. Chemical transmission of a nerve signal by neurotransmitters at a synapse Neurotransmitters A chemical released by one neuron that affects another neuron or an effector organ (e.g., muscle, gland, blood vessel). Neurotransmitters are small molecules that serve as messengers

More information

The Nervous System. Nervous System Functions 1. gather sensory input 2. integration- process and interpret sensory input 3. cause motor output

The Nervous System. Nervous System Functions 1. gather sensory input 2. integration- process and interpret sensory input 3. cause motor output The Nervous System Nervous System Functions 1. gather sensory input 2. integration- process and interpret sensory input 3. cause motor output The Nervous System 2 Parts of the Nervous System 1. central

More information

Activity 2 The Brain and Drugs

Activity 2 The Brain and Drugs Activity 2 The Brain and Drugs Core Concept: Addictive drugs affect signaling at the synapses in the reward pathway of the brain. Class time required: Approximately 40-60 minutes Teacher Provides: For

More information

Chapter 12 Nervous Tissue

Chapter 12 Nervous Tissue 9/12/11 Chapter 12 Nervous Tissue Overview of the nervous system Cells of the nervous system Electrophysiology of neurons Synapses Neural integration Subdivisions of the Nervous System 1 Subdivisions of

More information

ACTIVITY2.15 Text:Campbell,v.8,chapter48 DATE HOUR NERVOUS SYSTEMS NEURON

ACTIVITY2.15 Text:Campbell,v.8,chapter48 DATE HOUR NERVOUS SYSTEMS NEURON AP BIOLOGY ACTIVITY2.15 Text:Campbell,v.8,chapter48 NAME DATE HOUR NERVOUS SYSTEMS NEURON SIMPLE REFLEX RESTING POTENTIAL ACTION POTENTIAL ACTION POTENTIAL GRAPH TRANSMISSION ACROSS A SYNAPSE QUESTIONS:

More information

Chapter 22. The Nervous and Endocrine Systems Worksheets. 561

Chapter 22. The Nervous and Endocrine Systems Worksheets. 561 Chapter 22 The Nervous and Endocrine Systems Worksheets (Opening image copyright by Sebastian Kaulitzki, 2010. Used under license from Shutterstock.com.) Lesson 22.1: The Nervous System Lesson 22.2: The

More information

BIOLOGY 2050 LECTURE NOTES ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (A. IMHOLTZ) FUNDAMENTALS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM AND NERVOUS TISSUE P1 OF 5

BIOLOGY 2050 LECTURE NOTES ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (A. IMHOLTZ) FUNDAMENTALS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM AND NERVOUS TISSUE P1 OF 5 P1 OF 5 The nervous system controls/coordinates the activities of cells, tissues, & organs. The endocrine system also plays a role in control/coordination. The nervous system is more dominant. Its mechanisms

More information

BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES

BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES CHAPTER 3 1 LEARNING GOALS Discuss how the nervous system communicates internally. Describe the structure and function of neurons Describe how the neuron transmits information Describe

More information

Nervous System and Brain Review. Bio 3201

Nervous System and Brain Review. Bio 3201 Nervous System and Brain Review Bio 3201 Dont worry about: glial cells Oligodendrocytes Satelite cells etc Nervous System - Vital to maintaining homeostasis in organisms - Comprised of : brain, spinal

More information

Chapter 48-49: The Nervous System & Neurons

Chapter 48-49: The Nervous System & Neurons Invertebrates Chapter 48-49: The Nervous System & Neurons Radial Symmetry - Nerve net Cnideria Bilateral Symmetry double, ventral, solid nerve cord brain (cephalization) Vertebrates Dorsal, single, hollow,

More information

Announcements. Returning to Lecture. Measurement in Psychology 2/5/2014. C. Correlation. 1. Correlated = related 2. Coefficient of correlation (r)

Announcements. Returning to Lecture. Measurement in Psychology 2/5/2014. C. Correlation. 1. Correlated = related 2. Coefficient of correlation (r) Announcements Check Attendance/Grade Query Tool on class website (psy150a1.org) for: Attendance tracking Syllabus Quiz Chapter 2 Aplia Homework due next Monday (Feb 10) Aplia deadline for purchase extended

More information

Introduction to Neurobiology

Introduction to Neurobiology Biology 240 General Zoology Introduction to Neurobiology Nervous System functions: communication of information via nerve signals integration and processing of information control of physiological and

More information

UNIT 5 REVIEW GUIDE - NERVOUS SYSTEM 1) State the 3 functions of the nervous system. 1) 2) 3)

UNIT 5 REVIEW GUIDE - NERVOUS SYSTEM 1) State the 3 functions of the nervous system. 1) 2) 3) UNIT 5 REVIEW GUIDE - NERVOUS SYSTEM State the 3 functions of the nervous system. Briefly describe the general function(s) of each of the following neuron types: a) SENSORY NEURONS: b) INTERNEURONS: c)

More information

BIOLOGY 12 TRANSMISSION OF IMPULSES ACROSS SYNAPSES

BIOLOGY 12 TRANSMISSION OF IMPULSES ACROSS SYNAPSES Name: Pages: 326-327, 341-343 Date: BIOLOGY 12 TRANSMISSION OF IMPULSES ACROSS SYNAPSES How does a nerve impulse make a connection from an axon to the next nerve cell? The impulse must travel from the

More information

Endocrine System Nervous System

Endocrine System Nervous System Cells Endocrine System Nervous System Tissues Controls Organs Nervous System vs Endocrine System Electrical signals (graded potentials and action potentials) and chemical signals (neurotransmitters) Fast

More information

Functions of the Nervous System

Functions of the Nervous System The Nervous System Functions of the Nervous System 1. Control center for all body activities 2. Responds and adapts to changes that occur both inside and outside the body (Ex: pain, temperature, pregnancy)

More information

Functions of Nervous System Neuron Structure

Functions of Nervous System Neuron Structure Chapter 10 Nervous System I Divisions of the Nervous System Cell Types of Neural Tissue neurons neuroglial cells Central Nervous System brain spinal cord Peripheral Nervous System nerves cranial nerves

More information

Blood & Nervous Tissue. Blood. Nervous Tissue 10/13/2008. BY: Jeremiah Peters, Brett Maggard, Miranda Asher, and Benjamin Oakes

Blood & Nervous Tissue. Blood. Nervous Tissue 10/13/2008. BY: Jeremiah Peters, Brett Maggard, Miranda Asher, and Benjamin Oakes Blood & Nervous Tissue BY: Jeremiah Peters, Brett Maggard, Miranda Asher, and Benjamin Oakes Blood Fluid within blood vessels Doesn t connect or give mechanical support Transports Nutrients, wastes, respiratory

More information

Outline. Animals: Nervous system. Neuron and connection of neurons. Key Concepts:

Outline. Animals: Nervous system. Neuron and connection of neurons. Key Concepts: Animals: Nervous system Neuron and connection of neurons Outline 1. Key concepts 2. An Overview and Evolution 3. Human Nervous System 4. The Neurons 5. The Electrical Signals 6. Communication between Neurons

More information

BIOH111. o Cell Module o Tissue Module o Integumentary system o Skeletal system o Muscle system o Nervous system o Endocrine system

BIOH111. o Cell Module o Tissue Module o Integumentary system o Skeletal system o Muscle system o Nervous system o Endocrine system BIOH111 o Cell Module o Tissue Module o Integumentary system o Skeletal system o Muscle system o Nervous system o Endocrine system Endeavour College of Natural Health endeavour.edu.au 1 TEXTBOOK AND REQUIRED/RECOMMENDED

More information

2401 : Anatomy/Physiology

2401 : Anatomy/Physiology Dr. Chris Doumen Week 5 2401 : Anatomy/Physiology Introduction Neural Tissue TextBook Readings Pages 388 through 397. Make use of the figures in your textbook ; a picture is worth a thousand words! Work

More information

Integrated Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology Third Edition

Integrated Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology Third Edition Integrated Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology Third Edition Chapter 3 Pharmacology of the Autonomic Nervous System Multimedia Directory Slide 19 Slide 37 Slide 38 Slide 39 Slide 40 Slide 41 Slide 42 Slide 43

More information

LESSON 3.2 WORKBOOK How do our neurons communicate with each other?

LESSON 3.2 WORKBOOK How do our neurons communicate with each other? LESSON 3.2 WORKBOOK How do our neurons communicate with each other? This lesson introduces you to how one neuron communicates with another neuron during the process of synaptic transmission. In this lesson

More information

! BIOL 2401! Week 5. Nervous System. Nervous System

! BIOL 2401! Week 5. Nervous System. Nervous System Collin County Community College! BIOL 2401! Week 5 Nervous System 1 Nervous System The process of homeostasis makes sure that the activities that occur in the body are maintained within normal physiological

More information

Modeling Excitatory and Inhibitory Chemical Synapses

Modeling Excitatory and Inhibitory Chemical Synapses In review, a synapse is the place where signals are transmitted from a neuron, the presynaptic neuron, to another cell. This second cell may be another neuron, muscle cell or glandular cell. If the second

More information

Collin County Community College BIOL Week 5. Nervous System. Nervous System

Collin County Community College BIOL Week 5. Nervous System. Nervous System Collin County Community College BIOL 2401 Week 5 Nervous System 1 Nervous System The process of homeostasis makes sure that the activities that occur in the body are maintained within normal physiological

More information

Neural Communication. Neural Communication. Myers PSYCHOLOGY - Chapter 2: Neuroscience and Behavior. Definitions

Neural Communication. Neural Communication. Myers PSYCHOLOGY - Chapter 2: Neuroscience and Behavior. Definitions Myers PSYCHOLOGY - Chapter 2: Neuroscience and Behavior 1. Neural communication - Neurons - How Neurons Communicate - How Neurotransmitters Influence Us 2. The nervous system 3. The endocrine system 4.

More information

Version A. AP* Biology: Nervous System. Questions 1 and 2. Name: Period

Version A. AP* Biology: Nervous System. Questions 1 and 2. Name: Period Name: Period Version A AP* Biology: Nervous System Directions: Each of the questions or incomplete statements below is followed by four suggested answers or completions. Select the one that is best in

More information

Neurons: Structure and communication

Neurons: Structure and communication Neurons: Structure and communication http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/gall1.html Common Components of a Neuron Dendrites Input, receives neurotransmitters Soma Processing, decision Axon Transmits

More information

Portions from Chapter 6 CHAPTER 7. The Nervous System: Neurons and Synapses. Chapter 7 Outline. and Supporting Cells

Portions from Chapter 6 CHAPTER 7. The Nervous System: Neurons and Synapses. Chapter 7 Outline. and Supporting Cells CHAPTER 7 The Nervous System: Neurons and Synapses Chapter 7 Outline Neurons and Supporting Cells Activity in Axons The Synapse Acetylcholine as a Neurotransmitter Monoamines as Neurotransmitters Other

More information

Chapter 44 Neurons and Nervous Systems

Chapter 44 Neurons and Nervous Systems Nervous System Cells Neuron a cell Chapter 44 Neurons and Nervous Systems signal direction dendrites cell body Structure fits function many entry points for signal one path out transmits signal signal

More information

Bio Factsheet

Bio Factsheet Number 155 Answering exam questions on neurones and synapses You must know the structure (histology) of a neurone, the functions of its component parts and be able to distinguish between different types

More information

1. Name the two major divisions of the nervous system and list the organs within each. Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System

1. Name the two major divisions of the nervous system and list the organs within each. Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System CHAPTER 10: NERVOUS SYSTEM I OBJECTIVES 1. Name the two major divisions of the nervous system and list the organs within each. Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System Brain Spinal Cord Cranial

More information

action potential afferent neuron Weblike; specifically, the weblike middle layer of the three meninges. arachnoid astrocytes autonomic nervous system

action potential afferent neuron Weblike; specifically, the weblike middle layer of the three meninges. arachnoid astrocytes autonomic nervous system action potential A large transient depolarization event, including polarity reversal, that is conducted along the membrane of a muscle cell or a nerve fiber. afferent neuron Nerve cell that carries impulses

More information

Section: Chapter 5: Multiple Choice. 1. The structure of synapses is best viewed with a(n):

Section: Chapter 5: Multiple Choice. 1. The structure of synapses is best viewed with a(n): Section: Chapter 5: Multiple Choice 1. The structure of synapses is best viewed with a(n): p.155 electron microscope. light microscope. confocal microscope. nissle-stained microscopic procedure. 2. Electron

More information

2Lesson. Outline 3.2. Lesson Plan. The OVERVIEW. Lesson 3.2: How do our neurons communicate with each other? LESSON. Unit1.2

2Lesson. Outline 3.2. Lesson Plan. The OVERVIEW. Lesson 3.2: How do our neurons communicate with each other? LESSON. Unit1.2 Outline OVERVIEW Rationale: This lesson is intended to introduce students to the process of synaptic transmission, which is how one neuron communicates with another neuron. Using the pain pathway as a

More information

Warm-up. Warm-up. Warm-up. Chapter 48. Why do animals need a nervous system? 3/9/2012. Nervous System

Warm-up. Warm-up. Warm-up. Chapter 48. Why do animals need a nervous system? 3/9/2012. Nervous System Warm-up Objective: Explain how membrane potentials arise from differences in ion concentrations between cells' content and the extracellular fluid. Warm-up: Cells from this structure migrate to other parts

More information

Nerve Cell Flashcards

Nerve Cell Flashcards 1. What does the word innervates mean? Refers to a nerve supplying a muscle or organ. For example, The phrenic nerve innervates the diaphragm muscle. 2. 3 parts of the Nervous System 1. Central Nervous

More information

Name Group. 8. Growth 9. Insulin 10. Iodine 11. Manufactures 12. Nervous system 13. Neuron 14. Neurotransmitter

Name Group. 8. Growth 9. Insulin 10. Iodine 11. Manufactures 12. Nervous system 13. Neuron 14. Neurotransmitter THE NERVOUS AND ENDOCRINE SYSTEM Name Group 0. Translate all these words 1. Adrenaline 2. Brain 3. Cerebellum 4. Cerebrum 5. Dendrite 6. Dwarfism 7. Goiter 8. Growth 9. Insulin 10. Iodine 11. Manufactures

More information

Objectives. ! Describe the major structures of the nervous system. ! Explain how a nerve impulse is transmitted.

Objectives. ! Describe the major structures of the nervous system. ! Explain how a nerve impulse is transmitted. Objectives! Describe the major structures of the nervous system.! Explain how a nerve impulse is transmitted.! Distinguish between the functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems.! Identify

More information

PSYCH 260 Exam 2. March 2, Answer the questions using the Scantron form. Name:

PSYCH 260 Exam 2. March 2, Answer the questions using the Scantron form. Name: PSYCH 260 Exam 2 March 2, 2017 Answer the questions using the Scantron form. Name: 1 1 Main Please put in their proper order the steps that lead to synaptic communication between neurons. Begin with the

More information

Elizabeth Biopsychology (PSY 302) The Synapses 08/29/2017. The Synapses

Elizabeth Biopsychology (PSY 302) The Synapses 08/29/2017. The Synapses Elizabeth Biopsychology (PSY 302) The Synapses 08/29/2017 The Synapses Conduction of a Depolarization o In dendrites: passive propagation : There is attenuation of signal transmission -Further away they

More information

Chapter 3 Biological Foundations and Neuroscience

Chapter 3 Biological Foundations and Neuroscience Chapter 3 Biological Foundations and Neuroscience Copyright 2001 by McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited Heredity! Chromosomes! Threadlike structures that come in 23 pairs, one member of each pair coming from each

More information

The Nervous and Endocrine Systems Worksheets

The Nervous and Endocrine Systems Worksheets The Nervous and Endocrine Systems Worksheets Douglas Wilkin, Ph.D. (DWilkin) Say Thanks to the Authors Click http://www.ck12.org/saythanks (No sign in required) To access a customizable version of this

More information

Neuron types and Neurotransmitters

Neuron types and Neurotransmitters Neuron types and Neurotransmitters Faisal I. Mohammed. PhD, MD University of Jordan 1 Transmission of Receptor Information to the Brain the larger the nerve fiber diameter the faster the rate of transmission

More information

Fundamentals of the Nervous System and Nervous Tissue. Nervous System. Basic Divisions of the Nervous System C H A P T E R 12.

Fundamentals of the Nervous System and Nervous Tissue. Nervous System. Basic Divisions of the Nervous System C H A P T E R 12. C H A P T E R 12 Fundamentals of the Nervous System and Nervous Tissue Nervous System Sensory input Integration Motor output Figure 12.1 Basic Divisions of the Nervous System Brain CNS Spinal cord Nerves

More information

PHYSIOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS FOR SURVIVAL

PHYSIOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS FOR SURVIVAL PHYSIOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS FOR SURVIVAL HOMEOSTASIS Homeostasis means staying similar or unchanging and refers to the constant internal environment or steady state of an organism. It also includes the processes

More information

Chapter 45 Neurons and Nervous Systems

Chapter 45 Neurons and Nervous Systems Nervous System Cells Neuron a cell Chapter 45 Neurons and Nervous Systems signal direction dendrites cell body Structure fits function many entry points for signal one path out axon signal direction transmits

More information

Chapter 28 Nervous Systems

Chapter 28 Nervous Systems Chapter 28 Nervous Systems PowerPoint Lectures for Biology: Concepts & Connections, Sixth Edition Campbell, Reece, Taylor, Simon, and Dickey Copyright 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Lecture by Edward J.

More information

Nervous System. Chapter Test A. Part A: Multiple Choice. Part B: Matching. Part C: Interpreting Drawings CHAPTER 33

Nervous System. Chapter Test A. Part A: Multiple Choice. Part B: Matching. Part C: Interpreting Drawings CHAPTER 33 Chapter Test A CHAPTER 33 Part A: Multiple Choice In the space at the left, write the letter of the term or phrase that best completes each statement or answers each question. 1. Neurons are specialized

More information

Nervous System. Unit 6.6 (6 th Edition) Chapter 7.6 (7 th Edition)

Nervous System. Unit 6.6 (6 th Edition) Chapter 7.6 (7 th Edition) Nervous System Unit 6.6 (6 th Edition) Chapter 7.6 (7 th Edition) 1 Learning Objectives Identify the main parts (anatomy) of a neuron. Identify the 2 divisions of nervous system. Classify the major types

More information

The Nervous System -The master controlling and communicating system of the body

The Nervous System -The master controlling and communicating system of the body The Nervous System -The master controlling and communicating system of the body Functions: -Sensory input -Integration -Motor output Organization of the Nervous System Central nervous system (CNS) -Brain

More information